Tag Archives: nintendo 64

Jose Otero, IGN: ‘Attaching and detaching [Joy-Con] from the [Switch] is satisfying to the point that it’s almost addictive’

Jose Otero, IGN, timestamp 3:11:

Outside of the tiny face buttons, the analog sticks, digital triggers, and shoulder buttons feel solid and well made.

The Joy-Con are surprisingly comfortable and versatile in the hand too. And attaching and detaching them from the console is satisfying to the point that it’s almost addictive.

I remember feeling satisfaction attaching and detaching Controller and Rumble Paks from the Nintendo 64 controller’s expansion port.

I can’t wait to get my hands on this thing.

Tagged , , , , , ,

Nintendo 64 and Avoiding ‘Sequelitis’

Sam Machkoveh, Ars Technica:

Perhaps most notably, this was the last console on which Nintendo could rehash its older characters and series without fielding non-stop complaints about “sequelitis.” The console’s best first-party games were mostly sequels—Super Mario 64, Ocarina of Time, Mario Kart 64, Star Fox 64, F-Zero X, even Wave Race 64 and Excitebike 64—and yet all of them felt incredibly new thanks to their steps up to fully 3D engines. Nintendo had been a purely 2D game-making company for nearly a decade, yet it somehow pulled off the transition to 3D gaming in pretty much every way that Sega flubbed its own total overhaul.

Yours truly, in a November 2014 post titled Iterative vs. Redesigned Experiences:

If the doomsayers are correct and Nintendo’s failure is eminent, redesigns are going to be required to prevent it. So far, the majority of first-party titles on Wii U are iterative: Mario Kart 8, Super Smash Bros. Wii U, Super Mario 3D World, Pikmin 3, Donkey Kong: Tropical Freeze. While not every redesign has worked in Nintendo’s favor (I’m looking at you, Star Fox Adventures…), they are at the very least refreshing. This is another reason why I think Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker is genius; while it’s not a new take on a old classic (because there is no old classic!), it’s a new perspective from the Mushroom Kingdom. Until then, it’s back to smashing and karting.

Pokémon Go was the most recent example of a redesigned rather than iterative experience. Real-world Pokémon is an experience many fans have yearned for since the days of Red and Blue (or Green). Nintendo’s decision to make Niantic, Inc.’s Ingress a venue for real-world Pokémon was not only brilliant, but for a company that’s built their namesake on changing our perspectives, hidden-in-plain-sight.

With surprise experiences like Pokémon Go and Nintendo’s further foray into the new terrian of smartphone hardware, we are sure to see at least a handful of  redesigned experiences on mobile. With the NX, my hopes are not so high. But if anyone can reimagine the console experience, it’s Nintendo.

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Grant Kirkhope Releases Banjo-Kazooie OST on Bandcamp

Kyle Hilliard, GameInformer:

Grant Kirkhope, composer for Rare who created the Banjo-Kazooie soundtrack along with many others, has posted the soundtrack in its entirety online for download.

When we say the entire soundtrack, we mean everything. Among the 164 tracks, you will find familiar tunes, but you will also find the small musical cues and fanfares related to things like opening doors and collecting certain objects.

I’ve been streaming the Super Mario 64 OST from YouTube at work a lot lately. (Yes, YouTube.) I understand Nintendo has a sales strategy in place for their OSTs (see Super Smash Bros. 3DS Sleep Mode OST), but come on. Want the Super Smash Bros. OST? Here’s the deal (emphasis mine):

Buy and register both the Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Super Smash Bros. for Wii U games to receive a special soundtrack from Club Nintendo!

I’m not sure how Kirkhope is able to release this content, but he’s got my money. (And I’ve got a great Nintendo 64 era OST in ALAC.) Download here.

Someone call Koji Kondo and tell him we are ready for his box set.

Tagged , , , , ,